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20130817
20130817
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
win it 15-13. dennis alan used to coach and look at drew brees back here. 1 mississippi, 2 mississippi, 3 mississippi, 4. he was 14 of 18202 yards and easy touchdown throw there. 17-0 saints. good numbers and 12 of 16 and $1.24. raiders were down at the break and their first team was out played. but their second teamers, they fought hard. seneca wallace by david bass and ryan robinson touchdown and raiders lose it 28-20. it is a chance to gain some ground on first place texas because the rangers lost to seattle. dan and i loosen up before every show. it gets the neck going. he is not my ennis he is yo ennis. that his his 20th homer. bottom of the seventh and he knocks in a hustling catch. he scored from first and top 9 and two men on as cabrera with a liner to third that looks scary. donaldson turns it into the game ending double play. 3-2 the final. the giants visiting south beach and playing the marlins. the two lowest scoring teams in the national league combined for 24 runs. hector sanchez set a season high in runs scored. they win a slug fest. abc7 sports brought to you by river r
-13. dennis alan used to coach and look at drew brees back here. 1 mississippi, 2 mississippi, 3 mississippi, 4. he was 14 of 18202 yards and easy touchdown throw there. 17-0 saints. good numbers and 12 of 16 and $1.24. raiders were down at the break and their first team was out played. but their second teamers, they fought hard. seneca wallace by david bass and ryan robinson touchdown and raiders lose it 28-20. it is a chance to gain some ground on first place texas because the rangers lost to seattle. dan and i loosen up before every show. it gets the neck going. he is not my ennis he is yo ennis. that his his 20th homer. bottom of the seventh and he knocks in a hustling catch. he scored from first and top 9 and two men on as cabrera with a liner to third that looks scary. donaldson turns it into the game ending double play. 3-2 the final. the giants visiting south beach and playing the marlins. the two lowest scoring teams in the national league combined for 24 runs. hector sanchez set a season high in runs scored. they win a slug fest. abc7 sports brought to you by river rock casino. >>
: smiting goliath might as well be marshall ganz's job description. it began in mississippi's freedom summer of 1964 when his fury against injustice pulled him out of harvard and into the struggle for civil rights. from there, he signed on with the legendary cesar chavez and the united farm workers and for 16 years, struggled to unionize the men and women in the fields of california who toiled endless hours and mounting days, picking crops for next to nothing. three decades after marshall ganz had dropped out of harvard, he went back to finish his degree and earn a doctorate. a few years later, he was asked to become the architect behind the obama campaign's skillful organizing of students and volunteers. today, marshall ganz is a founder of the leading change network, a global community of organizers, educators and researchers mobilizing for democracy. you'll find more of his experience and philosophy in this book, "why david sometimes wins" marshall ganz, it's good to meet you. >> marshall ganz: it's good to meet you, bill. >> bill moyers: stories have been a powerful part of your life. wh
guarding the strategically vital mississippi trade route. in the springtime thousands flock to 'rendezvous' the spirited 18th century fur trapper holiday. friendly site supervisors give you the history which includes a free tour of the museum the exhibits and air conditioning the perfect remedy to a hot day of paddling. we're in the northern end of the colony of louisiana, at that time. this fort is governed from new orleans. its a journey into the past you wont soon forget. coming up we're crusin' with my dog, chuck, looking for pet- friendly destinations. ♪my school bus is my limo my school bus is my limo♪ ♪chauffer? you know, fer' sho'♪ ♪man, my school bus is my limo♪ ♪new cap with my brim low ridin' in my limo♪ ♪new hoodie new jeans a few dollars got me in those♪ ♪back to school with a brand new backpack♪ ♪ain't no fool, got a matching pencil case♪ ♪got pencils full in a fat stack♪ ♪'cause mom's a member of shop your way (ay...ay...ay)♪ ♪stop signs come out and can't no one pass♪ ♪stop signs come out and can't no one pass (fades)♪ go back-to-
see the city name down on the lower left, mississippi. the number next to the city is the derivative of the gps marker for this google location and i sort of transposed the numbers and used that. i wanted to connotate that virtual world and also there was a visual connection to the photographic heritage that was pretty wild. on top of this moment in time, there is also a breaking down of the imagery thaps in the google pictures themselves, most of these are lo fi and i chose that i guess because of the esthetics. it did not contain the same look as these and it also erode the truth and makes the lens a little bit blurry, it alters things from a technical point of view. so, you could see these pictures that sort of describe them as drive-by pictures that we are drive-by really captures this and not necessarily immersive in any way. it is literally a car driving by capturing a moment. some of this has been done in the past, walker evans took pictures out of a moving vehicle. in fact, strangely, right upstairs in the library before this talk i was looking through my side and i have on t
to coach under saints boss peyton. breeze 1 mississippi 2 mississippi 3 mississippi 4 mississippi. got all day to find a receiver and hit stills. 14 of 18 for 202 yards. 17 nothing saints. buck 24 on the money due to moore. raiders down at the half. then defense comes through. quarterback wallace hit hard by 7 round pick bass. robinson for the scoop and score but raiders fall in new orleans 28-20. cal football team open up the season in just two week against northwestern. have a true freshman taking the snap head coach dikes has named goff the starting quarterback today. 4 star recruit out of may run catholic high school. big guy. 6 foot 4 very consistent. he can thank his dad jerry for the strong am. major league pitcher never pressured his son. >> s when i was younger i raised me to play the fwaip. talk to him before the game he said have fun. i try to do. have if you please do my job and play football. >>reporter: a open up a weekend series with cleveland tonight. chance to gain some ground on first place texas because the rangers lost early this evening to seattle. thi
francisco then to go back to mississippi or texas or whether we have escaped from. this is the only place on earth that we have so we have a special bloogs to maintain a sanctuary for lgbt people. i think this is the moment where the city is recognizing there's a problem and not all gay people are rich and thank you for your support >> thank you. >> good afternoon, commissioners. i'm at lyric. i feel it's important for the commissioners to approve this as a former queer trans youth it's difficult four us i mean the queer and queer variant. when i was in the homeless shelter it was difficult i faced many prejudices. even when shelter say they address accident queer or the transgenders i know they don't. i notice a lot of any sisters from the age of 16 to 24 their subject to a lot of abuse and be it physical or verbal they suffer abuse in general. it's hard to exist in a closed-minded society. you're not seen as the person you are but whatever someone else knows you represent. so many of my sisters are forced out into the street to do prostitution or anyway to make a living. i feel as tho
that hillary cited her speech and she did cite examples were in the south, mississippi, texas, florida, south carolina. she is suggesting that since 1965 and 2013 the white people in the south are irrevocably racist and cannot be trusted. half of the country below the mason-dixon line still cannot be trusted and this is a person who wants to be president of the entire united states and this is the basis on which she's going to run to turn out as jason suggested, black voter turnout. in 2005 the federal election reform commission headed by jimmy carter and former secretary of state jim baker said that voter i. dchlt laws should be promoted because they will enfranchise black voters. she's suggesting that no one could possibly disagree with her. well, serious people do disagree with her on this. >> let me ask a political question, jason. what is the benefit for republicans pushing -- that's what they're doing -- a lot of these states are pushing this are republicans. not universally, but in north carolina the government flipped. the republicans pushed some of these laws. are they getting much o
of the mississippi. youre starting to quiet down. you're away from the hustle and bustle of the world. and the movement of the river and all that really does settle you down. professional river guide, michael clark, leads the camping expedition. with the setting sun after a hard day of paddling we reach our first destination an uninhabited sand bar known as mosenthein island. hiking into the forest we search for dry ground. heavy rains and the swelling river make it a challenge. but no worries if youre new to this because clark and the 'big muddy adventures' team knows where to go. theres really not a lot of
. in wasn't mississippi. it was not too-- it was a different kind of state. this is punitive. it's vindictive. it's vengeful. it's just a way-- there is no evidence of any voter fraud of anybody using somebody else's identification to vote. if there were, you could say it's an over-reaction. this is a created fabrication to basically discourage, if not make impossible, voting by groups, people who belong to groups who don't ordinarily vote republican, who vote democratic. 56% of the people in north carolina voted on election day. early voting rather. there will be no early voting. it's just an attempt to make it difficult to vote. >> i guess i sort of agree. i would say two things. first, one of the great stories in american history and in the south in the last couple of years, couple of decades, is the gradual empowerment and franchisement of african americans. i think one's basic attitude is you don't want to be on the wrong side of that story. so i do think if you're supporting this, you're putting yourself on the wrong side of that story. having said that, do i think it's a h
lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s, you know, who lived there? well, as i was driving, you looked closer, there was puffs of smoke coming from the roof. it was not someone who lived there. someone was still living here in the year 2002, 2003. one day, myself and matt black, a photographer who, you know, is kind of a modern day dorothy lang, evans, we pulledded off the side of the road, came over the railroad tracks across this little dirt road here, across from this vineyard, and we pulled up to the shack. it was in better shape then, but a tarp paper shack, and as we walked up, there were rabbit furs that had been -- that were hammered on to the wall. i remember knocking once, twice, and this place was on stilts. the door creeked open, and there stood this black man who looked like he'd been lifted from the mississippi delta, 1930s. he had a stutter. in fact, later he told us that he came west with a stutter, one state at a time. his name was james dixon, 95, he was living here and had since the 40s. he was part of the migration of blacks who did something that no blacks in ameri
of the time in which you were raised. i was raised in the '60s and -- >> in mississippi. >> yeah, and i'm a -- not only that a student of my history. i've said this many times, it's not a part of who i am to use that word, i understand why other people do. it's impossible for me to do it because i know the history, and i know that for so many of my relatives whom i don't know, who i don't know by name, people i'm connected to, my ancestors, that was the last word they heard as they were being strung up by a tree. that was the last sense of degradation that they experienced as, you know, some harm was caused to them. i just -- it's just not a part of the fabric of who i am. so out of respect to those who've come before and the price that they paid to rid themselves of being relegated to that word, i just don't use it. >> i understand lee daniels said that he used to use the word, and you two had a discussion -- >> i said lee, you ain't going to be using that word around me. lee, no you're not going to use that word around me. and i think it's used appropriately in the film. i mean, i thi
traveled to mississippi where marijuana is illegal, but here on the campus of one of the country's oldest universities, ole miss, a huge stash of marijuana is under lock and key. >> this is our vault. >> this is some pretty tight security. look at this door. >> mahmoud runs what's called a marijuana potency project. what's the potency of this? >> this is about 8%. >> for three decades now his team has analyzed weed confiscated from drug busts. >> this is 36% thc. you can smell it. it has a good aromatic smell. >> how much is this worry you, 36% thc confiscated? >> very dangerous material. for someone that is not experienced in marijuana smoking takes some of this, and they're going to go into the negative effects of the high, the psychosis, the irritation, irritability, paranoia, all of this. >> while not all the plants are this high, there's no question he has seen a trend. in 1972 the average potency was less than 1% thc. now it's nearly 13%. >> are people becoming more obsessed with high thc marijuana? >> i think so. they're starting out with a half a percent and 1%, and they get a goo
to mississippi to visit his family. he was in a store. he made a comment about a white woman and that led to him being picked up by a bunch of racists and murdered. that was the emmitt till reference. >> brutally murdered. >> to say the least. >> shot through the head, thrown into the river. >> all for making a comment about a white woman that was not all that offensive. >> was it fair to say, to relate the trayvon martin case -- >> i don't think so. till became a symbol for that era and i don't think that was the right example. >> i don't know. i think there will always be a difference of opinion and it will never change, so why don't we just move on. i think oprah can have a lot of fun with us by constantly saying things every day, seeing if we will cover it. like you know what, i don't want mayonnaise on my tuna fish sandwich. then "the five" the next day will go tuna fish, really, oprah, tuna fish and mayonnaise? what is wrong with you! what is happening to you! could this hurt your brand? >> i like mayonnaise! >> i hate tuna fish but love mayonnaise. >> it is weird, you can't separate the t
, now until september 3rd. that's the power of german engineering. >>> february 25th, 1870 mississippi became the first ever african-american sworn into the united states senate. revels was elected by the mississippi state legislative the reconstruction era and was only given his seat after a heated debate among senators. "new york times" story from that day. the colored member admitted to his seat in the senate. here's how the "times" described the scene in the senate chamber that day. the ceremony was short. his demeanor was as dignified as to be expected under the circumstances. the abuse poured upon him and during his race over the last two days may have shaken the nerves of anyone. the vast throng in the gallery showed no signs of feeling one way or the other and left very quietly. >>> now, contrast that with the scene in newark this past tuesday night when cory booker came closer to joining the senate with a blowout in the democratic primary. >> it is such an honor to be your nominee, to be your democratic nominee for the united states senate. thank you! >> here's the thing. betw
in madison, mississippi, thank you for holding on. you're on booktv on c-span2 with melanie phillips. >> caller: thank you for taking my call. ms. phillips, i've enjoyed you today. and as i was listening to you, um, i kept thinking of hypocrisy, abuse, double standards -- some of of which you talked about. some of the standards that you, um, are talking about today are great indeed, but certainly everybody wasn't given an opportunity to live by those standards. your, the caller before talked about how do we return to those standards, and i think the right needs to start by cleaning up their own house. if you have double standards, hypocrisy and abuse of power, people are going to reject those notions outright in anybody who espouses those beliefs. so until the right can clean up their own house and make sure that -- and while they have righteous indignation, let it be across the board. you know, i can hear you if your righteous indignation is only for those things that affect what's in your best interests and not in my best interests. so i wondered if you could comment on that. >> ho
of your competitors are holding strong. host: gulfport, mississippi, steve on our republican line. caller: i just wanted to make a couple of comments. one, i'm happy that the department of justice is trying to keep this merger from occurring. but the biggest problem that the airline industry has is that they have terrible, horrible customer service. they ou pay for a ticket, do not guarantee the plane will take off on time, they don't guarantee the plane will arrive on time, and if you happen to be landing in an airport where you have to switch from one airplane to another airplane, they don't even guarantee that they'll land on time and give you now time to get to the second departure or second leg of your trip on to your destination. the biggest problem the airline industry has is a total lack of customer service or customer concern, and that is why there aren't as many people flying as there should be, and that is why they are now charging for things like a bag, ok, if you bring a bag with you, they now charge you for that, and they're nick and he will diming everybody to death, if you
audience he was a kid from chicago who had gone to mississippi to visit his family. he was in a store. he made a comment about white woman. that lead to him being picked up by a punch of color racists and murdered. that was the reference they made. >> brutally murdered. >> brutally murdered to say the least. >> shot in the head and thrown into a river. >> all about making a comment about a white woman that was not that offensive. >> is it fair to relate the trayvon martin case to -- >> i don't think so. till was -- really became a symbol for that era. i don't think that was the right example. >> thoughts? >> i don't know. there will always be a difference of opinion and it will never change. why don't we just move on? i think oprah can have fun with us by constantly saying things every day and seeing if we will cover. it i don't want mayo on my tuna fish sandwich. and then on "the five" the next day we will go, tuna fish? really, oprah? tuna fish? what is wrong with you? what is happening to you? could this hurt your brand? >> i like mayo. >> i hate tuna fish, but i love mayo. >> that's w
of 2007, when in the middle of a summer's day, that bridge collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as they said that day, a bridge should not just fall down in the middle of america. not an eight lane bridge in the middle of rush hour, and not a bridge that is six blocks from my house. people were killed. hundreds of people injured. do you know what we do when it does break down, when something like that happens in america? we rebuild. lessbuilt that bridge in than 13 months. we rebuild just like they are rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild just like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild, because that is what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure. it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and are -- our dams. [applause] senatee do you think the passed the bipartisan waterville, what are develop and act -- water bill, water development act? in ourve served military, denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied entry. the senate finally passed a bipartisan, comprehensive immigration bill w
california or new york but louisiana, mississippi. >> that is the important point the interesting immigration graphic you would hear from the experts later but traditionally immigrants have shunned the south of man has been a problem that now use the dixie's like north carolina wednesday with the biggest percentage increase is georgia. that has become the high-growth state to the point where people ask our immigrants more attracted to a state with high welfare benefits or to the state that has jobs? what we have found is on balance democrats are more likely to go to low unemployment rates than with high welfare benefits which is the important timing because people are coming here because they want a job the. >> and it does make sense if you leave your country. >> it does make sense but there is so many people on the other side of this issue that the immigrants come here for welfare. some do but the vast majority do not. >> a very important point. >> so now with the international experts the author of a chapter of the bush institutes solutions looking at growth and immigration and evidence she
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)